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Just for Fun -> Learn Magic Tricks -> Card Tricks -> Danish Force Card Sleight

The Danish Force

by Jean Hugard

Sleight Tutorial for Card Magicians

This suprising effect is a good beginning to the Ambitious Card routine (kid's love it too).

This is a comedy force originated by Clement de Lion. The idea is to have a card push itself forward spontaneously just as the spectator is about to take a card. De Lion used the old fake, two cards with a piece of elastic between them. The card to be forced was pushed into the fake and so held. The pressure being relaxed as the spectator reached out, the card would glide into his hand.

It is, however, a difficult matter to insert the fake in the pack and prevent the card making premature appearance. A simpler plan is to use the even older principle of the rising card. Take a length of fine black silk, about eighteen inches, tie a knot at one end and insert it in a minute slit in the end of the card to be used. Draw the thread over the back of this card, place a second card on it and bring the thread back over it. To the other end of the thread tie a small black safety pin, fastening it under the vest. (Blifaloo notes: you can find gimmicks like "The Raven" or retractable invisible thread contraptions from most online magic supply shops for relatively cheap that will simplify this effect's prep work).

If these two cards are placed in the pack, when it is thrust outwards, the card will glide out to meet the spectator's hand. As he takes it, the withdrawal of the pack will free the thread. The two cards thus prepared can he carried quite safely in the lower vest pocket. To add them to the deck is an easy matter and a simple cut will bring them to the middle.

 

This amusing feat makes a very good opening for the Ambitious Card trick. Say you use the Jack of Diamonds. After the comedy force inquire what the card is. "The Jack of Diamonds," you say. "That's the most troublesome card in the deck. Always pushing himself forward. Put him on the top out of the way and take another." You pass the card to the middle and again force it by the classical method. Then continue with your own favorite version of the Ambitious Card, that always returns to the top of the pack.

From Card Manipulations by Jean Hugard (1934)

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